Young Rheumatic Diseases Day

World Young Rheumatoid Diseases Day

This year marks the second observance of World Young Rheumatic Diseases Day. This global observance is an excellent example of cooperation between physicians and parent associations to ensure optimal patient care for pediatric rheumatic patients.

World Young Rheumatic Diseases Day (WORD) is the result of the European Society for Pediatric Rheumatologists, PReS, and the European Parent/Patient Association (ENCA) efforts to bring this disease to the forefront of research and public knowledge.

There is still much to learn about pediatric rheumatic diseases, and consequently, reaching a prompt diagnosis is difficult.

What we do know is that early detection typically provides a better prognosis, whereas delays, misdiagnosis, and mistreatment can aggravate the damage and pain caused by the illness.

Therefore, the primary objective of this day is to raise awareness of these illnesses, as well as provide parents and physicians the necessary tools to recognize symptoms that require rheumatological attention.

Types of Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases

Pediatric rheumatic diseases is an umbrella term encompassing the spectrum of musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders, which affect children under the age of 18.

While most pediatric rheumatic diseases share many symptoms, such as joint swelling, pain, and inflammation, they are nonetheless distinct illnesses, and each has its own signs and symptoms.

Although many pediatric rheumatic diseases commonly affect the joints and internal organs, other body parts can also be affected by the condition, including the eyes, skin, muscles, and gastrointestinal tract.

The most common pediatric rheumatic diseases include:

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)

This condition was previously known as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA). JIA is the most common form of arthritis in children under the age of 16, and it’s also the most researched condition.

JIA is considered an autoimmune or autoinflammatory disease where the body’s immune system erroneously attacks healthy cells and tissues, causing the body to release inflammatory chemicals that damage the synovium.

As a result, the illness typically causes joint pain and inflammation in the hands, knees, ankles, elbows, and wrists.

Juvenile-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosis (SLE)

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune/inflammatory condition. In 10-20% of all cases it manifests before the age of 16.

In juvenile SLE, organ complication is more common, and in general, the disease is often more severe. In some cases of pediatric SLE, there is a genetic deficiency such as C1q deficiency. Therefore, screening is necessary.

Diagnosis of juvenile SLE can be challenging, and the disease management compared to adult-onset SLE requires special consideration given the long-term consequences of the illness and possible treatment toxicity.

Juvenile Dermatomyositis

This rare disease causes muscle inflammation and weakness, as well as a skin rash. Symptoms often manifest in children between the ages of 5 and 10.

The disease predominantly affects the muscles around the neck, shoulders, and hips. The skin rash commonly manifests in areas such as the eyelids, knuckles, and finger joints.

Although many children recover from the disease, others may experience long-term problems, including reduced mobility due to joint contractures, pain, muscle weakness, and delayed growth.

Scleroderma

Scleroderma is a chronic, degenerative disease that causes abnormal growth of connective tissue. The illness can affect the joints, skin, and internal organs of the patient.

The exact causes of Scleroderma are not known. Although it’s believed to be an autoimmune disease, there is a genetic factor associated with the disease, However, it is not hereditary.

There are two main types of Scleroderma: localized and systemic.

Localized Scleroderma: This form of the disease is more common in children, and it affects one area of the body.

Systemic Scleroderma: This type rarely occurs in children. Systemic Scleroderma affects the whole body.

Altus Infusion is tirelessly working to ensure access to biologic infusion therapies is available to all patients who require it. We advocate for all chronic patients, including those whose voice is often not heard, our children.

World Young Rheumatic Disease Day is the ideal platform to raise our voices, so more research is done to find better ways to manage these chronic childhood conditions. Together we can make a difference.

 

Disclaimer

The information provided on this blog regarding symptoms and possible treatment of illnesses is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Altus Infusion does not in any way guarantee or warrant the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of the information published in its blog and will not be held responsible for the content of any blog publication.

You should always consult your primary care physician for specific medical advice.

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Disclaimer:  The information provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. Any content regarding symptoms and possible treatment of illnesses is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Altus Infusion does not in any way guarantee or warrant the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of the information published in its blog and will not be held responsible for the content of any blog publication.

You should always consult your primary care physician for specific medical advice.

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